LOOKBOOK

Paris Season End

STRANGER THINGS AT LOUIS VUITTON

Frock coats, brocade, period dressing, 18th century aristocratic French garments, billowing blouses, waistcoats – and a Stranger Things T-shirt: Nicolas Ghesquière threw quite the curve ball to end the Spring/Summer 2018 season, one which has arguably been something of a stranger thing to unravel itself.


Liselore Frowijn SS18 - Photo by Regis Colin Berthelier for NOWFASHION

A historic plunder through time to unearth pieces we're not used to seeing and placing them in a modern wardrobe, it wasn't entirely what we expected – to which we refer you back to the frock coats: embroidered and elaborate in silver and gold and turquoise. But that was, in fact, the point: fashion time travel – and what if certain pieces that existed then, existed now, how would they look? It's something of an open-ended question. It's perhaps also something of a not-very-often-attempted question to answer. We're often so busy looking forward or into the immediate past than back through the history books, themselves now often lost among the Insta pages of time.

Though a frock coat might not be an obvious go-to now, let it grow on you? And in fact think about it a little more and Ghesquière has drawn on the shape in the past, only this time he let it loose with a more romantic and whimsical sentiment, in those fabrications, instead of that exacting strictness we're so used to seeing. So what does one wear with a brocade frock coat, lavish and opulent with embroidery? Little boxing shorts and chunky-clunky trainers.

It was a time-traveller's mash-up of style with one foot very much in the past and one in the future, the apparent future a far more familiar proposition to most (millennials) one imagines than the distant past: see the sneakers for the former and the billowing shirts and lacing for the latter.

There was an expansion of silhouette for dresses that appeared to have bustiers unravel into sleeves, ruffles or coils descending down the arm. And elsewhere dresses were walking snowflakes, crystallised and shimmering, with hi-tech trainers below; a party-time dressing proposition.

"Might it be possible to awaken the clothes of long-gone eras and infuse them with the spirit of today?" asked the show notes.

Potentially, it's a question that remains unanswered right now – it takes time for the eye to adjust to something new, or, in this case, old and historic. But certainly stranger things have happened and certainly on this catwalk they did – that T-shirt will be snapped up for sure.

90'S ICONIC FASHION ON #FASHIONPORN

 

 

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 Fashion loves the ‘90s. Seriously. Have you seen the runways lately? A little Margiela inspo here, some Helmut Lang references there…it’s inescapable. But why own redux styles when you can have the real thing? Enter #FASHIONPORN, a new pop-up from Byronesque, hosted in collaboration with Opening Ceremony. Open at 35 Howard Street through July 23, the vintage event brings fashion fans all the ’90s sartorial goodness, like wares from Helmut Lang, Balenciaga (by Nicolas Ghesquière), and more, that haunts your wet dreams.

“It’s a myth that these collections were big sellers at the time,” said Gill Linton, Byronesque founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief. “It’s only looking back now that people are starting to appreciate what these designers did, and how important their contribution to fashion was and still is. It was also the last time that fashion was really creative before the lawyers took charge,” Linton continued of the era. “[These ’90s styles] have reemerged because fashion is boring. Boring clothes at boring shows. I’m exaggerating to make the point—of course there are amazing exceptions and we are starting to see things change, mostly in London and Paris, definitely not in NYC. But broadly, people are looking back out of nostalgia and also for inspiration. These pieces sell because it’s great design that can’t be dated, still more creative than ever, and [these collections] have more meaning and integrity than most.”

 

 helmut lang Linton noted that the pop-up’s collection of Margiela—which is guarded in a secret back room on the third floor—is Byronesque’s best yet, even better than what was offered at the vintage seller’s recent Paris fashion week pop-up, which was raided by pretty much every designer, stylist, and editor in the biz. “Basically, if Mark Borthwick shot it, we have it. No fillers. All greatest hits.” Also up for sale are wares by Vexed Generation, a brand that Linton describes as the Helmut Lang of London in the ’90s. “People don’t realize how significant they were in fashion culture and what their influence has been, and still is. They haven’t been available for 20 years and we're honored to bring back their archives for the first time. Their designs and what they stood for are more relevant than ever. The infamous ninja hoods and bags, for example, are epic, and I believe will become the uniform for the vexed generation again.”

 

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Being the crème de la crème of vintage purveyors, Byronesque isn’t just hosting the pop-up. It’s also bringing fashion obsessives a 360 look at the relevance of these ’90s collections, printing a magazine—or manifesto, if you will—that features racy “fashion porn” spreads with some of the best merch, as well as words by fashion critic Alexander Fury.

We know this article’s been kind of a tease—at this point, you’re probably on the edge. All the more reason to run over to 35 Howard Street STAT. Seriously—these rare ’90s finds won’t be around for long. And once they’re gone, they’re gone.

Photos: Courtesy of Byronesque

Article found on: Fashion Unfiltered | Written by: Katherine K. Zarrella 

 

Find Iconic Helmut Lang and Maison Martin Margiela at Anastasia Boutique